Chaharshanbe Soori (The Festival of Fire)

Special customs and rituals take place in which everyone particularly children eagerly participate.

Culture & Heritage

Description

The Persian name of the festival consists of čahāršanbe, the name of “Wednesday” in the Iranian calendars, and SURI, most plausibly meaning “red” and referring either to fire or to ruddiness. On the eve of the last Wednesday of the Persian solar year, known as Chaharshanbe Suri or the Persian Festival of Fire, special customs and rituals take place in which everyone particularly children eagerly participate. The term Chaharshanbe Suri is made of two words meaning Wednesday and celebrations/red respectively, where young and old gather around and jump over fires that stay burning all night. These bonfires symbolize kindness, friendship, and light. undefined.

The Festival of Fire is a remnant of the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism, where fire represents God‘s light or wisdom. Zoroastrianism was the official religion of Persia (now Iran) from 600 BCE to 650 CE. (copied from itto.org) Around 2000 years ago followers of this doctrine built fire houses and temples where a fire was kept ever burning. itto.org The ruins of these sacred sanctuaries are now considered important archaeological sites in Iran, Iraq, and India. The festival of Chaharshanbeh Suri has its roots in the Zoroastrian celebrations of the battles of fire against evil. Granted, this time-honored religion does not put a lot of emphasis on rituals, but rather the ethical practices of “Good Words, Good Thoughts and Good Deeds”. undefined .